Kool G Rap & DJ Polo, Big Daddy Kane & Biz Markie – Erase Racism (1990)

Kool G Rap & DJ Polo, Big Daddy Kane & Biz Markie – Erase Racism

from Kool G Rap & DJ Polo’s Classic 1990 Album, “Wanted Dead Or Alive”.

Queens-based Kool G Rap & DJ Polo left one of the most impressive rap discographies in their wake. Though Kool G Rap’s growth as an MC from their first single in 1986 to their final album in 1992 was considerable, the duo started off running and never looked back. The pair never had the large profile enjoyed by others in Marley Marl’s extended family (including Big Daddy Kane, Biz Markie, and Roxanne Shanté), but aftershocks continue to be felt throughout the East Coast, from the Notorious B.I.G. to Nas to Wu-Tang Clan to the underground scene.

When their first single, 1986’s “I’m Fly”/”It’s a Demo,” was released on Cold Chillin’, G Rap was already a formidable MC who could boast with the best of them. However, it would be narratives that he would become most known for, in addition to some of the raunchiest rhymes hip-hop has ever known. Throughout the years, Marley Marl, Large Professor, and Sir Jinx provided valuable production assistance. The duo released the formative “I’m Fly”/”It’s a Demo” in 1986, but G Rap (born Nathaniel Wilson) truly broke out on the Juice Crew’s “The Symphony,” a group cut of great legend produced by Marley Marl that also included turns from Masta Ace, Craig G., and Big Daddy Kane. After a good deal of anticipation was built for the first Kool G Rap & DJ Polo album, Road to the Riches saw the light of day in 1989. Produced by Marl and released on his Cold Chillin’ label, the album included a handful of timeless moments while alluding to greater potential.That potential was fulfilled with the following year’s Wanted: Dead or Alive. Marley Marl remained partly responsible for the duo’s sound, while Main Source’s Large Professor and Eric B. also pitched in with production work. On this album, G Rap became an MC of top caliber; he expanded his range as a magnificent storyteller on tracks like “Streets of New York” (a number three rap single) and “Wanted: Dead or Alive.” Released in 1992, Live and Let Die landed the duo in a bit of hot water; its cover, depicting the duo feeding meat to rabid dogs in front of two restrained white men, gained a fair amount of attention in the press. The controversy played a role in shooting the album up to the Top 20 of the R&B/hip-hop albums chart, but the attention unfortunately waned. Just as accomplished as Wanted: Dead or Alive (if not more so), the album featured the sympathetic handiwork of Sir Jinx and Trakmasterz and helped bring G Rap’s increasingly profane and vivid tales to extreme levels.

G Rap and Polo went their separate ways shortly after that. G Rap put out three albums between the mid-’90s and early ’00s, while Polo cut a single with Ice-T and porn star Ron Jeremy. Landspeed kept the duo’s legacy alive through a low-key reissue campaign; in 2000 and 2001, separate releases combined the first two albums and anthologized their entire career together.

Extended & updated info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kool_G_Rap

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Comment (50)

  1. 💃👣💃👣💃
    Hip-hop before shit got evil…

    I mean just listen👂
    u can hear the soul of the people…

    all the more proof that the breakdown in our music is NOT with our artists but with the system which is rife with satanism.

    which goes to show you that they're attempting to use OUR music to corrupt & destroy us😠

    fight the powers that be👊

  2. Yall!!!!! THEY don't have COLABS like this anymore. Remember they took over the music industry so we won't HEAR songs like this again. Remember some or majority are SELL OUTS, sold their souls for the $, when our black people are getting killed, they should have come together like they did before and sang FREEDOM!!!!!!!! or freaking WE ARE THE WORLD!!!!!
    WHERE ARE THESE MILLIONAIRE SINGERS / ACTORS THAT VOICE THEIR OPINION!?!? I'm just saying.

  3. POSITIVE MESSAGE
    THE BROTHERS BACK IN THE DAY
    BROOKLYN,
    THE BRONX,
    HARLEM,
    AND
    QUEENS
    WAS ALWAYS PUTTING OUT A GOOD MESSAGE.
    THEIR VOICES
    ARE UNSUNG

    THE RAPPERS
    OF TODAY
    NEED TO GO BACK TO OLD SCHOOL
    HISTORY
    OF THE RAPPERS
    AND LEARN
    HOW TO DO IT
    RIGHT…….

    ✌🏾
    2019
    Debra Evans

  4. this joint should b playing every mornig for national anthem in schools everywhere … supermarkets, churches wherever music is played.. super timeless record

  5. I LOVE THIS JOINT, MAKES ME THINK OF JUNIOR HIGH. REAL LYRICS WITH A REAL PURPOSE. MY NATIONALITY IS REALITY AND YO A PREJUDICE MAN IS OF A DEVIL MENTALITY.

  6. Almost THIRTY YEARS LATER RACISM
    IS STRONGER THAN EVER. THE IN-
    TENTIONS OF THIS SONG ARE GOOD
    BUT THAT IS NOT REALITY. THE REALITY IS NOTHING HAS CHANGED.

  7. Even though this has been corny since it was released, they were striving for peace and unity… Nowadays, on the WorldStarHipHop comments, there’s nothing but evil, hate & ignorance

  8. "..in the days of slavery…" you need to stop looking back to the days of slavery it is keeping yourselves down…like BDK was there himself. please stop cultivating your pain. Imagine jews going; "…i remember how we were forced into a train and got beaten out at Auswitch…" everybody would say thats too much.. Stop making the link: black = slave = gangster= marginalized. Mandela nor Obama were thinking like that i bet!

  9. "i was raised in a nation of asians…" ??? i guesse as long as it rhymes right…..not so accurate lyrics i think. the beats are more lovely then nowadays but their flow wasnt like 2pac or snoop or meth yet…but it was more varied, way less uniform then hhop today i feel..

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